WHAT IS MINDFULNESS?

We live in a fast-paced world, where being present is often replaced by being available 24/7.

We are mostly navigated through our days by appointments, chores, deadlines and expectations most of which are laid upon us by the ever so fast changing outside world. Metaphorically speaking, we tend to end up in the backseat of a car, rather than in the driver’s seat.

We are raised to be multi-taskers, led into misbelief that more is better. Mindfulness is the opposite of this automatic pilot mode.

 

Mindfulness is moment-by-moment awareness of our thoughts, feelings, bodily sensations & the environment surrounding us.

Without judgement, it involves acceptance of both negative & positive thoughts & emotions. It helps us move through them with balance & ease.

 

RESEARCH

Mindfulness practices are drawn from over 30 years of clinical research. In the western world it all started with Jon Kabat-Zinn, who first developed MBSR (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction) in an effort to offer effective, sustainable treatment to chronic pain patients.

This evidence-based, secular practice has been found successful in the areas of medicine and psychology, as well as the corporate world and professional sports environments, and is now making its way into education.

The glorification of busy – Culturally we tend to believe that the more tasks we perform at the same time, the more valuable we become as a person. However, quite the opposite has been shown in research by Stanford communication Professor Clifford Nass and his colleagues E. Ophir & A. Wagner.

Studies have shown that if we multitask all the time, we “are suckers for irrelevancy”, meaning that we are unable to filter out information that is not relevant to the task at hand. Multitasking slows us down in any process, because we lose the ability to focus.

Over the past decade, findings in the area of neuroplasticity (brain plasticity) suggest that the adult brain is adaptable and can change through our lives. It is not hard-wired and fixed, which means we are capable of changing old habits.  New neural pathways can be carved in our brain with repeated and directed attention towards our desired change. Regular mindfulness practice does make a difference in our lives.

 

BENEFITS

  • STRONGER IMMUNE SYSTEM & IMPROVED PHYSICAL WELLNESS
  • EMOTIONAL REGULATION & STRESS REDUCTION
  • HEALTHIER COMMUNICATION & INTERPERSONAL RELATIONSHIPS
  • HIGHER LEVEL OF COMPASSION & EMPATHY
  • GREATER FOCUS & PRODUCTIVITY
  • WELL-BEING & HAPPINESS